23 / CHALLENGES OF A NEW EUROPE

Chances in Crises

21 – 24 April 2010        Send to printer


Course directors

Wieger Bakker, University of Utrecht, Netherlands
Bart van Steenbergen, University of Utrecht, Netherlands
Ladislav Rabušić, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic
Paul Stubbs, Institute of Economics, Zagreb, Croatia


Course description:

Dear participants and resourcepersons to the Challenges of a New Europe course,

Most of us face difficulties in coming to Dubrovnik this weekend. For the moment the situation is as follows. Some airports hope to open again tonight (Amsterdam), some airports just closed (Zagreb and as I understood correctly Kiev). The groups coming from Czech Republic and from the Netherlands re-booked their flights to tomorrow, Sunday. Should there be an extra delay, the Dutch goup will travel on Monday.

It is the intention of the course directors to start with the course anyway, but maybe start one day later than was planned (on Tuesday). The course might be a bit more condensed, but we think it is possible to do it in four days. Extending the course is not really an option.

We hope everyone will be able to re-book their flights. For those participants for whom it is relevant: should re-booking your flight turn out to be diffcult, say Tuesday instead of Monday, we think that still is an option, but try to inform us before you do so.

As soon as there is any new information we'll let you know. We also try to update the news page of our website (www.inclusionexclusion.eu) with the latest information.

With best regards and more than ever looking forward to meeting you all in Dubrovnik,

Wieger Bakker

Partners:

Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands (Prof. dr. Godfried Engbersen)

Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania (Dr. Mircea Maniu)

Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey (Prof. dr. Hakan Yilmaz)

University for Humanistics, Utrecht, the Netherlands (Prof. dr. Douwe van Houten)

Brief description of the focus

The years 2008 and 2009 will go down in the history books as years of global crisis.

The financial crisis, also known as the credit crunch had and still has, a huge impact on our economies. Banks collapsed or had to be saved with unprecedented amounts of taxpayers’ money, millions of people in Europe lost their jobs, governments’ debts skyrocketed and even some seemingly prosperous countries were forced to ask for IMF loans. Writing at the end of 2009, the crisis seems to have passed its peak, in terms of rising stock market indexes and general economic stabilization. However, the real effects will become even more visible in the years ahead: for instance in budget cuts on public services and in unemployment rates and in wider social impacts.

At first sight it seems that the crisis brought nothing but misery. But is that really all it is? Or does the crisis also offer us, in Europe, new ideas, new possibilities and chances for new policies? Does the crisis lead to new forms of social exclusion or are there new opportunities for social policies which help to foster social inclusion? The crisis did lead to a reassessment of the role governments can play. During 2009 the treaty of Lisbon was ratified in almost all the EU member states. Would this have been possible without the crisis? Will it lead to further European cooperation in dealing with European problems? Did it or can it intensify the further political integration of the EU? What are the prospects for candidate and prospective candidate countries to join a revitalised EU?

These, and many other questions will be at the heart of the 2010 edition of the course Inclusion and Exclusion in Contemporary European Societies and can be captured in the central theme of this edition: Challenges of a New Europe: Chances in Crises.

This course is the seventh edition of a bi annual series of courses of which Inclusion and Exclusion in Contemporary European Societies is the central theme. In 1998 the emphasis was on the exploration of the concept In- and Exclusion. In 2000 there was an accent on empirical data. The edition of 2002 paid extra attention to Inclusion and Exclusion in terms of (policy and governmental and non-governmental) intervention. In 2004 the course focussed on the EU-enlargement and the future of ‘civil society’ and ‘governance’. In 2006 we were looking at the dilemmas in dealing with diversity and the directions that are open for action and in 2008 we focussed on the emerging paradoxical trend of a Europe that is on the one hand becoming more provincial, parochial and frozen and on the other hand becoming more dynamic, cosmopolitan and a global player.

Selected themes

During the course, in plenary presentations and in interactive workshops, we will discuss the challenges contemporary Europe is facing in the light of the economic and financial crisis. We will explore the conditions for innovation and the conditions under which Europe and the EU can develop, as well as new forms of European Governance and strategies to support European citizens to cope with Europe.

In discussing the central theme of the 2010 edition, Chances in Crises, we will focus in workshops and plenary presentations, on six main themes:

1. European Integration and Social Inclusion:

Chances for Overcoming the Social Exclusion of Vulnerable Groups?

2. Changing roles of Government and Civil Society:

Opportunities for solving Social Problems?

3. 20 Years after the Collapse of Communism:

Crisis, Amnesia and Nostalgia: an Assessment of Costs and Benefits

4. Converging and Diverging Values in Europe:

Starting Point for Joint Policies?

5. Migration and the Economic Crises

Moving beyond Fortress Europe: liquid migration and flexible citizenship?

6. The New Generation:

Youth and Education after the Crisis

Working methods

In this course we bring together students that are likely to have a future career within or connected with the public domain (and lecturers and researchers) from the so called ‘old EU’ (especially the Netherlands), new and candidate member states of the EU and from the so called new neighbors. The aim is to share and to discuss our knowledge and perspectives on the challenges of Europe. The intensive international part of the course in Dubrovnik includes different longer and shorter plenary presentations by resource persons from different countries, workshop sessions with presentations by participants, forum debates, simulation games, future creating workshops, and so on. As lecturers and participants stay in the same hotel, discussions will be extended during evening hours within an informal setting.

Participants

The course is primarily open to masters students, for bachelor/degree students in the last year of their studies, and (beginning) Phd students. In general the course is aiming at students of disciplines that are dealing with issues related to the public domain (social sciences including e.g. sociology, political science, public administration and policy sciences, anthropology, European Studies, law, economics, organizational sciences etc.). The course is selective. The selection will be made by the course directors and/or the participating institutes.

Assignments

Participants are expected to give a workshop presentation and to prepare a paper on research related to the central theme of the course. The participants will be asked to send in proposals for workshop presentations. The proposals have to be related to the central theme of the course and one of the six themes that have been mentioned above.

During the months preceding the course there will be assistance through information on the website and by e-mail. The final papers will be published on the website after the course. Furthermore the participants are expected to write a short summary of their own presentation and a short report on one of the other presentations. The summaries will be part of the hard copy and the e-version of the final report of the course. Requirements can be found on the website www.inclusionexclusion.nl. (The update version will be available January 2010).

Information

For information on the program, costs, grants and the application procedure Dubrovnik 2010, contact Dr. Wieger Bakker (course co-director). Reports from earlier editions (1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2006 and 2008) are available.

Dr. Wieger Bakker

Utrecht School of Governance

Bijlhouwerstraat 6

3511 ZC Utrecht (the Netherlands)

tel: 030-2538101

e-mail: W.E.Bakker@uu.nl.

PROGRAMME:

Monday April 19: Crisis and Social Inclusion -Delayed

09.15 - 9.45 Welcome and getting acquainted

9.45 - 11.30 Don’t look back in Anger. General Introduction into the theme: Challenges of a new Europe. Chances in Crises

Bart van Steenbergen (Utrecht University)

11.45 - 12.30 Crisis, Exclusion and Challenges for a New Europe: Personal Priorities

Informal Debate in Parallel Workshops

15.00 – 16.30 Is Europe Diverging? Income distribution and Unemployment before and after the crisis

Brigitte Unger (Utrecht School of Economics, The Netherlands)

17.00 – 18.00 Crisis, what crisis?

Forum Debate

Tuesday April 20: Interdependent Europe, Governance and overcoming Exclusion

09.00 - 10.30 Systemic Interdependence of Risks in the Age of Globalization. What can we Learn by Comparing Finance, Food, News, and Infectious Diseases?

Frans van Waarden (University College Utrecht, The Netherlands)

11.00 - 12.30 Challenges for a Renewed Europe: why the EU needs the Western Balkans

Wolfgang Petritsch (Austrian Ambassador to the OECD in Paris)

15.00 - 18.00 Participant Presentations in Parallel Workshops

1. European Integration and Social Inclusion:

Chances for Overcoming the Social Exclusion of Vulnerable Groups?

2. Changing roles of Government and Civil Society:

Opportunities for solving Social Problems?

3. 20 Years after the Collapse of Communism:

Crisis, Amnesia and Nostalgia: an Assessment of Costs and Benefits

Wednesday April 21: Conflict, new Exclusions and Inclusion in the Making

09.00 - 10.30 Lost Children of the Transition? Arguments for a new empowering political economy

Paul Stubbs (Economic Institute Zagreb, Croatia)

11.00 – 12.30 Sex Education as Battlefield: Culture Wars in the Croatian Context

Alexander Stulhofer (Dept. of Sociology, University of Zagreb)

15.00 - 18.30 Workshops and plenary presentations of results

Workshop A: From Analysis to Intervention: strategies for policy development

Marianne Dobbe and Maurits Hoeve

Workshop B: Citizenship and Violence; the chances of cultural diversity

Douwe van Houten and René van Rijsselt

Workshop C: Creating Scenarios for an Inclusive Europe

Bart van Steenbergen, Paul Stubbs, Wieger Bakker

Thursday April 22: A Europe of Values & Migration

09.00 - 10.30 Values and attitudes in the Czech Republic in comparison with European countries. Main Trends 1991- 2008

Ladislav Rabusic (Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, Brno)

11.00 - 12.30 No place for my name? Kosovo Roma’s Transnational Movements and Deportations in the European Union

Ana Devic (Centre for Racism, Ethnicity and Nationalism, University of Glasgow)

15.00 - 18.00 Participant Presentations in Parallel Workshops

4. Converging and Diverging Values in Europe:

Starting Point for Joint Policies?

5. Migration and the Economic Crises

Moving beyond Fortress Europe: liquid migration and flexible citizenship?

6. The New Generation:

Youth and Education after the Crisis

Friday April 23: What can we do?

09.00 - 10.30 Redesigning Social Welfare in Serbia and coping with Crises

Gordana Matkovic (Centre for Liberal Democratic Studies, Belgrade)

11.00 – 12.30 New regional orientations

Forum debate

15.00 - 16.30 Building a political agenda of chances (parallel workshops)

17.00 – 18.00 Debating the agenda

18.00 - 18.30 Summary and Conclusion

Wieger Bakker (Utrecht School of Governance, the Netherlands)


Course lecturers

Gordana Matković, University of Belgrade, Serbia
Brigitte Unger, University of Utrecht, Netherlands
Wieger Bakker, University of Utrecht, Netherlands
Rene van Rijsselt, University of Utrecht, Netherlands
Frans van Waarden, University of Utrecht, Netherlands
Bart van Steenbergen, University of Utrecht, Netherlands
Ana Dević, Fatih University, Turkey
Paul Stubbs, Institute of Economics, Zagreb, Croatia
Ladislav Rabušić, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic


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